Long-Term Effects of Suboxone

A note from a reader with a question about Suboxone:

Suboxone has really worked for me in getting off vicodin.But I have been unable to stop taking Suboxone.It occurred to me recently that this may turn into a lifelong dependency.If so, what are the long-term side effects of Suboxone?

Thanks so much,

My Answer:
Suboxone really is best thought of as a long-term, perhaps life-long medication.Your attachment to pain pills will in all likelihood be life-long as well; most people who stop Suboxone are surprised at the cravings for opiates that they have.I don’t think Suboxone increases the cravings at all, but rather it is just so effective at eliminating them that people forget how attached to opiates they once were.I generally recommend that people stay on Suboxone ‘forever’, or until something better comes around– they are much safer on Suboxone, as it helps them avoid an impulsive relapse that can put them in jail, kill them, etc…
We do not know of many long term effects from Suboxone.Long term opiate use in general can lower testosterone levels in men and cause things from that, like reduced sex drive and I suppose even infertility.I assume that buprenorphine will do the same.There are the other short-term side effects that over time become long-term side effects– dry mouth (which long-term can cause an increase in tooth decay), constipation (which could lead to hemorrhoids, diverticulitis, anal fissures or peri-rectal abscess), sweating (which could lead to… problems dating?). The opiate antagonist naltrexone can cause liver damage, and it is related to naloxone, which is a component of Suboxone– in general the naloxone does not get absorbed, and so the chance of liver damage is likely minimal.It may be a good idea to check a set of labs once per year, though, to check the liver, kidneys, thyroid, and blood cell system, just for safety’s sake.
Probably the worst thing about long-term use is that some docs insist upon keeping everyone on Suboxone in endless therapy.I do not think that therapy is generally required, and I do not think that ‘forced therapy’ is very helpful.But it is hard to find a doc who will treat with Suboxone as they would treat with any other treatment for a chronic condition– that is, to prescribe the medication without placing a number of other requirements on the person.
I hope that answers your questions–
Take care,
J